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William Renwick (2000)

Schubert's Impromptu in G-flat: A Response to Adam Krims

Canadian University Music Review, 20(2):31-41.

Schubert's Impromptu in G-flat Major is a test case for the varied functions of the upper neighbour. After reviewing Schenker's notion of the upper neighbour, I propose that context is the key to a consistent reading of the upper neighbours in Schubert's Impromptu. The parallelism of neighbours at different levels accounts for much of the organic unity of the composition. Then I reconsider Schoenberg's notion of structural functions, demonstrating the complementary relationship of Schenker and Schoenberg. Finally I revisit the concept of productivity. I argue that most critical approaches employ productivity as a matter of course. The question arises as to which combinations of insight are the most productive.

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