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You are here: McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind > Publications > The Effects of Manipulating Spatial Location of Visual Cue Placement on Gait Among Individuals with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study

Jeffrey D Holmes, L K Brigham, Mary E Jenkins, Emily A Ready, Sara G Lutz, Andrew M Johnson, and Jessica A Grahn (2015)

The Effects of Manipulating Spatial Location of Visual Cue Placement on Gait Among Individuals with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study

Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics, 33:263-278.

Aims: To investigate the effect of manipulating the spatial location of a visual cue used to manage gait impairment among individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Methods: Six individuals with Parkinson’s disease who experience severe freezing of gait were asked to complete the Timed Up and Go test three times in each of the following conditions: no cue, cue presented at the users feet, cue presented at a distance equivalent to step length, and cue presented at a distance equivalent to stride length. Step length, velocity, walker positioning, and time taken to complete a 180 degree turn and the Timed Up and Go test were recorded. Results: Visual cueing led to an improvement in 4/5 outcome measures with magnitude of improvement being dependent upon the spatial location of cue presentation. Conclusions: Findings suggest that visual cueing and the spatial location of cue presentation are highly individualized in terms of managing gait disturbance.

visual, parkinson's disease