Personal tools
 
You are here: McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind > Publications > Finding and Feeling the Musical Beat: Striatal Dissociations between Detection and Prediction of Regularity

Jessica A Grahn and James B Rowe (2012)

Finding and Feeling the Musical Beat: Striatal Dissociations between Detection and Prediction of Regularity

Cerebral Cortex, 10.1093/cercor/bhs083.

Perception of temporal patterns is critical for speech, movement, and music. In the auditory domain, perception of a regular pulse, or beat, within a sequence of temporal intervals is associated with basal ganglia activity. Two alternative accounts of this striatal activity are possible: “searching” for temporal regularity in early stimulus processing stages or “prediction’ of the timing of future tones after the beat is found (relying on continuation of an internally generated beat). To resolve between these accounts, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate different stages of beat perception. Participants heard a series of beat and nonbeat (irregular) monotone sequences. For each sequence, the preceding sequence provided a temporal beat context for the following sequence. Beat sequences were preceded by nonbeat sequences, requiring the beat to be found anew (“beat finding” condition), or by beat sequences with the same beat rate (“beat continuation”), or a different rate (“beat adjustment”). Detection of regularity is highest during beat finding, whereas generation and prediction are highest during beat continuation. We found the greatest striatal activity for beat continuation, less for beat adjustment, and the least for beat finding. Thus, the basal ganglia's response profile suggests a role in beat prediction, not in beat finding.

fMRI, beat perception, prediction, auditory perception, music, rhythm