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You are here: McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind > Publications > Advances in neuroimaging techniques: implications for the shared syntactic integration resource hypothesis

Jessica A Grahn (2012)

Advances in neuroimaging techniques: implications for the shared syntactic integration resource hypothesis

Language and Music as Cognitive Systems, Oxford University Press.

The shared syntactic integration resource hypothesis (SSIRH) generates specific predictions about neural overlap in the instantiation of processes required for syntactic integration in music and language. Syntactic integration occurs over time, through communication between areas maintaining domain-specific representations and areas responsible for domain-general processing. Analyzing neural overlap and temporal communication requires techniques that enable superior spatial resolution and localization, as well as dynamic connectionist frameworks, rather than interpretation of static activation maps. With recent advances in neuroimaging analysis techniques, we are coming closer to be able to address these questions. For example, multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) techniques can make more effective use of information in the fMRI signal, whereas examinations of connectivity between different neural areas can tell us more about the dynamic temporal interactions occurring in the brain. What follows is a review of a selection of the techniques in development for functional neuroimaging data, the use of which may be able to provide definitive evidence for or against the SSIRH.

music, neurobiology, language