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You are here: McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind > Publications > Changes in neuromagnetic beta-band oscillation after music-supported stroke rehabilitation

Takako Fujioka, Jon Ween, Shahab Jamali, and Bernhard Ross (2012)

Changes in neuromagnetic beta-band oscillation after music-supported stroke rehabilitation

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1252:294-304.

Precise timing of sound is crucial in music for both performing and listening. Indeed, listening to rhythmic sound sequences activates not only the auditory system but also the sensorimotor system. Previously, we showed the significance of neural beta-band oscillations (15-30 Hz) for the timing processing that involves such auditory-motor coordination. Thus, we hypothesized that motor rehabilitation training incorporating music playing will stimulate and enhance auditory-motor interaction in stroke patients. We examined three chronic patients who received Music-Supported Therapy following the protocols practiced by Schneider. Neuromagnetic beta-band activity was remarkably alike during passive listening to a metronome and during finger tapping, with or without the metronome, for either the paretic or nonparetic hand, suggesting a shared mechanism of the beta modulation. In the listening task, the magnitude of the beta decrease after the tone onset was more pronounced at the posttraining time point and was accompanied by improved arm and hand skills. The present case data give insight into the neural underpinnings of rehabilitation with music making and rhythmic auditory stimulation.
musical processing, rehabilitation